A Breath of Fresh Air

A Breath of Fresh Air

Written by nick

Topics: Stained Concrete Floors

When concrete is initially poured a sealer is applied, after the finishing procedures, to help keep moisture in the concrete during the curing process *(28 days). This sealer is typically called a cure-and-seal as it helps cure the concrete and provides some sealer benefits. Removing this prior to staining is essential for the stain to be able to react with the concrete surface. This sealer is applied when the concrete is fresh and still soft so it really locks-in to the surface. The only way to remove the sealer while maintaining the integrity of the concrete surface is to use a chemical that will break the bond.  Most of these chemicals are very dangerous, flammable, and require the use or ventilation equipment, protective gloves, and special disposal methods. Our clients wouldn’t like that–They want their home’s environment to be safe and comfortable during the entire process. The way my company handles the removal of the cure-and-seal is to use a specialty soybean based cleaning solution that is manufactured for us right here in Fort Wayne. The product has a fresh cut orange smell and is safe to use in enclosed spaces with limited ventilation like a basement.  We used this product last week to remove a cure-and-seal on an 8 year old basement floor.  Below is a video and pictures of the completed work. Project was located in a residential basement in Portland, Indiana.

*There are other ways to cure concrete such as using curing paper or soaking the concrete in water. If you are planning to stain your new concrete please inform your concrete contractor to not use a cure and seal on the surface.

dancerconcrete.com



Nick Dancer, President

Dancer Concrete & Liquid Armor Concrete Coatings

create@dancerconcrete.com  – 877.341.5705

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